Llanfechell Memorial

Cymdeithas Hanes Mechell


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Llanfechell in the early 19th Century





Llanfechell Memorial


with thanks to Mrs Iola Roberts, Mrs Beryl Jones, Mr Nigel Thomas & Mr Robert Williams


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Click on photographs to see larger versions


                                                                  


 Unveiling ceremony after The First World War

Unveiling ceremony after The Second World War

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 Click here to go to .... The Second World War 1939-1945  

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The First World War 1914-1918



Frederick Pelham Trevor, Brynddu

James Frederick Venmore, Wylfa

Richard Jones, Trosmynydd

John Oliver Williams, Frondeg

Roger Humphreys, Tregele

John Owen Jones, Trosymynydd

Robert Jones, Glanygors

Thomas Pritchard Lewis, Tynycae

Owen Owen, Fron

Owen Roberts, Carregydaran

Evan Williams, Brynddu Road

John Williams, Minffordd

Owen Williams, Penymynydd


Click on the names for more information 

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Frederick Pelham Trevor, Brynddu

 Frederick Pelham Trevor was born in Peru, Chile on 17th November 1879. He married Winifred Mills and they had two children, Meriol Trevor and Arthur Trevor. The family lived at Brynddu during the period before he went to war in 1915.


His family at Brynddu, 1911


The family Swimming at Cemaes, 1911


Brynddu, His home before he went to war


Menin Gate Cementary where he was buried


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James Frederick Venmore, Wylfa

Lieutenant J. Frederick Venmore, the son of Mr James Venmore, a Liverpool citizen and a Justice of the Peace of the city and an Ex. High Sheriff of Anglesey.

He was educated at the Liverpool College and Mill Hill School, London. He subsequently studied architecture at Liverpool University and was engaged in that profession until, at the outbreak of War, he enlisted as a private in the 3rd Battalion of the Liverpool ‘Pals’. He received a commission in the 14th Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers and proved himself a most capable and popular officer, greatly beloved by officers and men alike for his bravery and devotion in the field.



The following is a description of how Lieutenant Venmore won the Military Cross for conspicuous bravery. ‘On the night of January 30th, 1916, Lieutenant Venmore was on duty as patrol officer in front of the British trenches in France, when a sentry in the firing trench reported that three men in an advanced listening post had been wounded. Two of these men were just able to crawl back to the British lines over the barbed wire, but the third man was too seriously wounded to follow, being shot through both legs. Lieutenant Venmore volunteered to go to his assistance, and took with him a non commissioned officer (Corporal William Williams, a Caernarfon man), who was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal.

They went out under heavy fire over the parapet, and after great difficulty brought in the man over the wire and two ditches. This brave action was succeeded by a further gallant act on the following morning, when a message was received that a man had had his arm blown off at another listening post, practically unapproachable by daylight. Lieutenant Venmore again undertook to go to his aid, once more taking with him Corporal Williams. They crawled across the open ground in the face of heavy machine gun fire. The sufferer was reached, his wounds attended to, and he was subsequently bought to safety. Both the officer and his companion were most highly congratulated by the brigade and divisional officers.


Unhappily Lieutenant Venmore whilst commanding his Company at the attack on Mametz Wood in July 1916 was severely wounded in the arm but still persevering on in spite of his wound eventually met a gallant end.

'Dantzag Valley' Mametz Cementary where he was buried.


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Richard Jones, Trosymynydd

Richard Jones' home - Trosymynydd

Arras Cementary- where he was buried

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John Oliver Williams, Frondeg

Three Frondeg sons went to fight in the war, John, Huw and Bob. John was killed and the other two were wounded. Huw was shot in the stomach and he lost three of the fingers of his right hand. One family story recounts the story of Bob in the trenches with the son of Trosmynydd who was killed beside him. Bob was thirsty and drank water from the trench where his friend lay dead..

 Photographs of John Oliver Williams

Field Service postcards from John Oliver

For security reasons the soldiers were not allowed to write anything else in the postcards.


A letter from John Oliver to his family

Another letter from John Oliver to his family

 John Oliver Williams' home- Frondeg


Loos Cementary ,where he was buried.

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Roger Humphreys, Tregele

Roger Humphreys lied about his age - he was only seventeen when he joined up.



Roger and his younger brother


Roger and his family


Five sons went to war


A letter from Roger to his mother


A letter asking for his birth details so he could leave the army. Tragically he was killed two days before a copy of his birth certificate arrived.


 In recognition of his sacrifice.

The family receive a medal


 Roger Humphreys' home, Penrallt


Thiepval Cementary, where he was buried.

A family member visits Thiepval.


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John Owen Jones, Trosymynydd

He was the brother of Richard Jones who died on 13th  May , 1917 (six months before him.)


 John Owen Jones' home - Trosymynydd

Beersheba Cementary, Israel where he was buried

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Robert Jones, Glanygors

Robert Jones

Glanygors family

A letter from Annie to her brother


A letter to Robert from his parents


The  'Death Plaque'presented to his family following his death

Robert Jones' home- Glangors


A cementary in Alexandria where he was buried.


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Thomas Pritchard Lewis, Tynycae

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Owen Owen, Fron

Owen Owen's home-The Fron


Chwarel- his first home


Thiepval Cementary, where he was buried.

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Owen Roberts, Carregydaran

 Owen Roberts' home- Carregydarran

The War Cementary in Baghdad where he was buried.

Rolls of Honour held at the Commission's Head Office commemorating by name all the Commonwealth casualities who died in Iraq during the two World Wars.

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Evan Williams, Brynddu Road

The War Cementary in Jerusalem where he was buried


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John Williams, Minffordd

The Cementary in France where he was buried- ROCQUIGNY-EQUANCOURT


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Owen Williams, Penymynydd

Owen Williams


Owen Williams’ father


Owen Williams’ mother


 Owen Williams' home- Penmynydd


The 'Death Plaque'


Penmynydd today


Owen Williams’ medals


Helles Cementary where he was buried.

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According to his family he was killed while guarding a well.